Turning Point - Freedom Center for Women

2.3 (1 reviews) ADD YOUR REVIEW
4849 US 322
Franklin, PA 16323
8882728922 Visit Website

Paying for Treatment

  • Insurance is Accepted
  • Financing is not Available
  • Medicare is not Accepted
  • Medicaid is not Accepted

Treatment Insights

Turning Point Treatment Center's philosophy is based on the fact that addiction is a disease and utilizes a clinical model to treat the individual. Shortly after admission, an assessment is completed to determine the level of care appropriate for the client. Based on the assessment, a treatment plan is developed with the client that allows the client to recognize the severity of his or her addiction, gain knowledge of addiction and recovery, identify and deal with issues that may block ongoing recovery, and utilize available support for ongoing recovery.

Turning Point - Freedom Center for Women Reviews and Ratings Details

The following is based on a combination of Surveys of Alumni, Staff, Loved Ones, and Reviews and Ratings from around the web.

Reviews at a Glance

Are you an alumni, staff member, or loved one of someone who went to this facility?

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Mindy

I did the detox there I have to say the building it\'s self was old and over populated. They ran out of room in the men\'s building and ended up moving a large amount to of them to sleep in the detox ...


Areas of Focus
12-Step

The term “12 Step Program” describes a way to recover from addiction that is based on the model developed by Alcoholics Anonymous. Many drug and alcohol treatment centers base their treatment on 12 steps – the first three of which are situational, the next four addressing the practical issues created by the addiction, followed by two steps focused on making amends for hurting others. Steps 10 and 11 involve a deeper examination of the previous steps and the final step is focused on helping others avoid and recover from addiction.

Family Program

Research shows that the odds of successful, sustained recovery from addiction are far higher when family members and loved ones are involved in treatment. Drug and alcohol addiction often have genetic roots, whether related to substance abuse, mental illness or both. Family dynamics also play a role and, often, family members are the first to realize a loved one has developed an addiction. Also, it’s important for family members to understand and embrace the lifestyle changes that are required to sustain recovery.