Singles drinking more during lockdown

Cheers to Me? Singles drinking more during lockdown than those in relationships, survey reveals.

  • Half of single respondents admit they drink more because they are lonely
  • 46% say if they had a partner during lockdown, it would encourage them to drink less and make healthier choices
  • Infographic included

Your level of happiness is greatly influenced by the people with whom you choose to spend your time, which is why many Americans have found themselves struggling with their mental health during lockdown, especially those who had to make the decision to quarantine alone. Even if your circumstances have not been drastically disrupted during lockdown, limited interactions with the outside world can affect your happiness levels. Just as spending time with others can improve your mood, being alone can deduct happiness points, creating a distinct discrepancy in how people are coping with social distancing regulations across the country.

Recovery.org, a provider of addiction treatment resources and information, conducted a survey of nearly 4,000 adults, revealing a general consensus that it is singles who have been drinking more during lockdown than couples. Of the respondents, 58% thought this to be the case, compared to couples (42%).

View the following infographic for the survey results:

Singles drinking more during lockdown

The Happiness Scale: As humans, many of us thrive on the social interactions we typically have on a daily basis. Whether it be a hug from a loved one or high five from a colleague, the sensation of physical presence cannot be replicated on a virtual scale. For this reason, being quarantined apart from your friends and family can deduct happiness points from your overall mood. The survey also questioned respondents about their level of happiness during lockdown and found that the average person in a relationship ranks their happiness at 7.5/10. Comparatively, the average single rates their happiness just 6.6/10 – 1.1 happy points less than those in relationships. Generally, being in a healthy, loving relationship means you are more likely to have an outlet for sadness, frustration or emotions you may be feeling during lockdown. However, if you are single, you might internalize these emotions if you have no one to talk to.

It appears not having a companion by your side can have negative effect on your personal habits as 48% of singles admit being lonely is the main reason they drink more. This was followed by boredom (37%) and not having anyone around to monitor their drinking (15%). Moreover, the survey found that 46% of singles say if they had a partner, they would be less inclined to drink and more likely to make healthy choices.

For many citizens quarantining across the nation, staying home means you may find yourself with a bit more time on your hands than usual. One in 5 respondents who previously drank during the weekend only admit they now drink during the week as well. Broken down by gender, 25% of men admitted this compared to 23% of women. Perhaps this has something to do with not being able to socialize with friends after a long day at work and having to remain indoors.

Despite these statistics about the struggles of being single during lockdown, there is a silver lining to every cloud. In fact, considering the busy lives we are usually part of, it is no wonder that 46% of singles say the best part of not being in a relationship during lockdown is having more time for themselves. This was followed by time for personal growth (22%), not having someone in your space 24/7 (16%), independence (11%) and self-discovery (5%).

The majority of singles who are reaching for a cold one during lockdown say beer is the drink they consume most often (44%). This was followed by wine (31%), cocktails (17%) and spirits (8%).

Additionally, considering nearly a quarter (24%) of couples admit they often argue with their partner when one or both have been drinking alcohol, perhaps being single during lockdown is not the worst thing that could happen!

“Alcohol is a disease of loneliness and isolation, and with people still working from home and/or quarantining by themselves, the circumstances are ripe for overconsumption,” said American Addiction Centers’ Chief Medical Officer Dr. Lawrence Weinstein. “With alcohol easily accessible and drinking unmonitored, it is very easy to drink too much. If you notice that you’re reaching for alcohol or drinking more frequently than before, it may be time to address your habits. Its also important to keep in touch with your friends and family as they can be experiencing these issues as well. Communication is beneficial to all parties; check on your loved ones during these times because they can be struggling as well.

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