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Choosing the Best Inpatient Opium Recovery Center

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Opium is used in the production of drugs such as heroin. It is critical that an individual who takes too much opium gets help recovering from opium overdose. An opium overdose treatment program can provide you or your loved one with the medical treatment you need as well as critical addiction recovery services.

Signs of Overdose

” An opium overdose treatment program can provide you or your loved one with the medical treatment you need as well as critical addiction recovery services.”

If you suspect that you or someone close to you may be at risk for overdose, it is important to recognize the symptoms. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, symptoms may include:1

  • Shallow or difficulty breathing.
  • Low blood pressure.
  • Bluish coloring in the lips and nails.
  • Dilated pupils.
  • Stomach spasms.
  • Drowsiness.
  • Delirium.

In cases of overdose, it is imperative that you obtain medical treatment without delay. The University of Maryland Medical Center states that it is possible to recover from even acute overdoses if medical attention is provided in time. During the course of treatment, it may be necessary for the patient to receive breathing support as well as a narcotic antagonist that can be used to counteract the negative effects of the drug.2

In 2014 about 435,000 people were currently using heroin, an opium-based drug. If you or someone close to you is abusing opium or an opium-based drug, it is important that you seek help right away. Please contact us at 1-888-319-2606 Who Answers? for help locating opium recovery facilities in your area.

Taking the Next Step

addiction recovery

Once your overdose has been treated, the next step in the treatment process is to design a recovery plan that will meet your unique needs. It is important to seek out an opium overdose recovery center that will be able to conduct a thorough assessment of your current health situation. This may include determining whether you have any other addictions that will require treatment or any other possible health concerns. For this reason, an inpatient program is often the most suitable setting for recovery.4

In choosing an opium overdose recovery facility for yourself or a loved one, it is important to pay careful attention to the structure of the program. Many patients and their families often have questions regarding the length of a recovery program. Although 30-day recovery programs are common, the length of your treatment may vary based on the severity of your addiction, how you respond to treatment, and whether any co-occurring disorders or addictions are present.5

Individuals who suffer from substance abuse, including opium addiction, often experience a number of mental health issues. It is imperative to choose a treatment facility that will be able to address those issues. If you have a nutritional deficiency, a recovery center with a certified nutritionist who is trained in treating addictions may be an appropriate option. The nutritionist will be able to work with you or your loved one to design a healthy diet that will help to boost your overall health and give you the optimal chance for recovery.

Planning for the Future

It is also important to consider whether the opium overdose recovery program you choose will be able to provide you with stress management techniques. Such techniques can prove to be critical in helping you cope with recovery and overcome the urges you may experience to use the drug again after you leave treatment. This can be approached in a variety of ways. Options may include:6

  • Massage therapy.
  • Acupuncture.
  • Spa treatments.
  • Yoga.
  • Exercise.
  • Meditation.

It will also be important for you to learn to identify the issues that could trigger a relapse in the future. For many people, such triggers could involve exposure to high-risk situations. Building a strong social support network can prove to be critical in helping individuals continue their abstinence when they leave treatment.7 To facilitate this, you may wish to choose a facility that will allow the participation of friends and family members while you or your loved one is in recovery.

“Building a strong social support network can prove to be critical in helping individuals continue their abstinence when they leave treatment.”If you need assistance in locating an opium overdose recovery center, contact us today at 1-888-319-2606 Who Answers? . We are available 24 hours per day and seven days per week to speak with you. Recovery from opium overdose is possible. No matter how bleak things may appear at the moment, help is available to assist you in overcoming your addiction. Take the first step today.

Sources

[1]. Maisto, S.A., et al. (2015). Opiates. Drug Use and Abuse. Seventh Edition. Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning, pages 237-257.

[2]. Tetrault, J.M., and OConnor, P.G. (2009). Management of Opioid Intoxication and Withdrawal. In Ries, R.K., et al. Editors, Principles of Addiction Medicine. Fourth Edition. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 589-602.

[3]. Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality. (2015). Behavioral health trends in the United States: Results from the 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and
Health. http://www.samhsa.gov/data/.

[4]. Weiss, R.D., et al. (2008). Inpatient Treatment. In Galanter, M., and Kleber, H. D. Editors. The American Psychtiatric Publishing Textbook of Substance Abuse Treatment. Fourth Edition. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing, Inc., pages 445-458.

[5]. Mee-Lee, D., Editor-in-Chief. The ASAM Criteria: Treatment Criteria for Addictive, Substance-Related, and Co-Occurring Disorders. Third Edition. Chevy Chase, MD: The Change Companies.

[6]. Lee, D Y-W, and Wang, H. (2009). Alternative Therapies for Alcohol and Drug Addiction. In Ries, R.K., et al. Editors, Principles of Addiction Medicine. Fourth Edition. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 413-422.

[7]. Hser, Y-I, and Anglin, M.D. (2005). Drug Treatment and Aftercare Programs. In Coombs, R.H., Editor, Addiction Counseling Review. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, pages 447-466.

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Last updated on May 9, 2018
2018-05-09T10:40:20+00:00